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20130112
20130112
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
in las vegas, alexis wineman, miss montana, beaming like the others as they compete for the crown. but hers is a journey unlike any other. the little girl with the big smile but hiding underneath it, a giant hurdle. >> we knew for a long time there was something wrong, we just didn't know what it was. >> reporter: the little girl unable to relate to other children at school. the unexplained tantrums. the hours spent alone. she had autism but her parents and teachers didn't know it. one teacher saying, i don't get paid enough to handle this. no one talked about it in her small montana town. she wasn't diagnosed until she was 11 and no one thought she would ever make it here. at 18, alexis defied the odds. the first contestant with autism to compete in miss america. so you've had a little practice? >> oh, yes. >> reporter: and for the talent portion she plans a stand-up act. this is where you have to be funny up there. >> yes. i'm always funny up there. >> reporter: the same little girl who will tell you she never got the jokes. how did you know you were funny? >> i use it to deal w
of "the wall street journal," james kitfield of "national journal," alexis simendinger of real clear politics, and christi parsons of tribune newspapers. >> award winning reporting and analysis covering history as it happens. live from our nation's capitol, this is "washington week" with gwen ifill. corporate funding for washington week is provided by >> we know why we're here. to connect our forces to what they need when they need it. >> to help troops see danger before it sees them. >> to answer the call of the brave and bring them safely home. >> around the globe, the people of boeing are working together to support and protect all who serve. >> that's why we're here. >> additional corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by prudential. additional funding is provided by the annenberg foundation, the corporation for public broadcasting and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. once again, live from washington, moderator, gwen ifill. gwen: good evening. this week we got a peek at the obama administration's second-term priorities, at home a
history. miss montana, alexis, is the first miss america contestant diagnosed with autism. she said she used to spend hours alone in her room refuse to go talk to anyone. even though she was considered highly functioning, she was ridiculed because of a speech impediment and intense shyness. >> growing up, i was a loner, i barely hung out with anyone. i would stay in my room for hours just not wanting to talk to anyone. the girl you are seeing now is not the same girl you would have saw ten years ago. i have overcome so many of my symptoms. >> alexis credits her family with helping her become comfortable with herself. she said that enabled her to get out and try new things. >>> another contestant has made a difficult decision, miss district of columbia, alex rose, plans to undergo a double mastectomy after the competition whether she wins or loses. she's taking action to prevent breast kansas which are claimed the lives of her mother, grandmother, ain't and great-aunt. her mom was diagnosed in 2007. the competition is tonight at 9:00 right here on abc7. >>> well, tomorrow expect some bar
history. miss montana, alexis wineman, is the first miss america contestant diagnosed with autism. she said she used to spend hours alone in her room refuse to go talk to anyone. even though she was considered highly functioning, she was ridiculed because of a speech impediment and intense shyness. >> growing up, i was a loner, i barely hung out with anyone. i would stay in my room for hours just not wanting to talk to anyone. the girl you are seeing now is not the same girl you would have saw ten years ago. i have overcome so many of my symptoms. >> alexis credits her family with helping her become comfortable with herself. she said that enabled her to get out and try new things. >> you can see how she does in the 2013 miss america competition tonight at nine right here on abc7. something else you can expect. tomorrow some bart riders will be a bit underdressed as in they will not be wearing any pants. organizers improv everywhere have declared tomorrow to be the day for the twelfth annual no pants subway ride. the no pants party starts boarding around noon with a group photo planned
announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup. >>> hello from new york. i'm chris hayes here with alexis goldsteen, neil borofsky, stephanie kelton, professor of economics at the university of missouri kansas city and joe wisenthal. in the wake of the news of tim geithner's departure to be replaced with jack lu, we're talking about the geithner legacy. and because i think when you look at the first term, he's, i think it's hard to argue anyone was a more influential cabinet member. you know, the signature things that happened particularly in the midst of the crisis have been shepherded by tim geithner, he lasted all four years. they say he was incredibly successful -- incredibly influential. we're talking about his legacy. one of the things we said before break is this argument about the bailouts and the cost. the idea that, you know, people throw around the $700 billion figure which is a huge eye popping number and then the argument on the other side that time geithner will say taxpayers made money on the bailout. or you basically just said that. and neil, you have an issue with that. >
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)